Faculty

Rick Thomas

The fundamental premise of my work is that computational models from cognitive psychology and cognitive science can be adapted to provide testable process models of decision-making phenomena and optimized to support the decision-making of professionals. I direct the Decision Processes Laboratory (DPL). The DPL utilizes a range of experimental methodologies (behavioral, eye-tracking, EEG) and computational techniques (statistical, mathematical, neural networks) to investigate decision-making phenomena.

Daniel Spieler

The overarching theme of my research is interactionism—the belief that human behavior is inherently a function of individuals and the situations they experience. Thus, my specific streams of research focus on better understanding individuals and situations at work in mutually commensurate ways.

Eric Schumacher

Cognitive control refers to the set of processes by which we direct our actions toward a specific goal. At the most basic level, control processes allow us to translate a presented stimulus into an appropriate motor action. However, these processes and representations quickly become more complex when trying to understand more involved behaviors such as learning peoples names or watching and understanding films.

Ruth Kanfer

My research examines the role of motivation and self-regulation in work and achievement settings.  Past projects include work on how goals affect resource allocation during learning and performance and the role of self-regulation in job search and reemployment following job loss.

James S. Roberts

     My research interests are in the development and application of item response theory (IRT) models to measure psychological constructs.  Over the past two decades, I have developed a family of polytomous IRT models to unfold responses to test or questionnaire items.  These unfolding models imply higher item scores to the extent that an individual is located close to an item on a unidimensional latent continuum.  Unfolding item response models can be used to measure attitudes using responses from traditional Likert or Thurstone scales.

Dobromir Rahnev

I am broadly interested in high-level aspects of perceptual decision-making. My research attempts to elucidate the brain mechanisms that influence what we perceive, as well as build computational models that explain current findings and lead to novel testable predictions. Specific topics include: the role of the prefrontal cortex in modulating the perceptual process, the computational principles behind attention and expectation, the mechanisms that allow us metacognitive insight into the accuracy of our perceptual decisions, and Bayesian models of perception as inference.

Scott Moffat

My area of expertise is in the cognitive neuroscience of aging. My specialties include the application of functional and structural neuroimaging methods to understand cognitive and brain aging as well as behavioral endocrinology. I have devoted much of my career to the study of the effects of steroid hormones on behavior and brain function. Among my contributions to this field are studies assessing the effect of gonadal steroids on spatial cognition, hemispheric asymmetry and interhemispheric communication.

Frank Durso

Most of my current research would fall under the labels applied cognition or cognitive ergonomics: how cognition (e.g., knowledge, expertise, working memory, attention allocation, strategy selection) interacts with environmental components (e.g., technology, the representation of data, available automation, patient symptoms, presence of teammates) to affect the operator's performance, learning, transfer, workload, situation awareness, and strategic thinking.  Current projects are looking at errors in doffing preventative medical garb, detecting and identifying hospital acquired infections,

Richard Catrambone

I received my BA from Grinnell College in 1982 and my Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1988.

My research interests include:

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